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*99

(Source: pearl-nautilus)

florafaunagifs:

Leaf bug (Phyllium giganteum)

(via biovisual)


América América, Elia Kazan.
[+ citas de libros aqui]

América América, Elia Kazan.

[+ citas de libros aqui]

(via escondida-entre-los-libros)

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biodiverseed:


Fasciated daisy — Fasciated stems are produced due to abnormal activity in the growing tip of the plant.  Often an abnormal number of flowers are produced on affected stems. Normal branches may arise from fasciated stems. Fasciation is unpredictable and is usually limited to a single stem. It seldom recurs the following year.

Another fun fact: daisy leaves are edible.
#garden science #flowers #edible flowers #eat the weeds

biodiverseed:

Fasciated daisy — Fasciated stems are produced due to abnormal activity in the growing tip of the plant.  Often an abnormal number of flowers are produced on affected stems. Normal branches may arise from fasciated stems. Fasciation is unpredictable and is usually limited to a single stem. It seldom recurs the following year.

Another fun fact: daisy leaves are edible.

#garden science #flowers #edible flowers #eat the weeds

(Source: malformalady)

(Source: pearl-nautilus)

libutron:

The Saiga (Saiga tatarica): on the verge of extinction

Commonly known as Saiga, Mongolian Saiga, and Saiga Antelope, Saiga tatarica (Bovidae) is a very distinctive looking antelope, with a large, proboscis-like nose which hangs down over its mouth.

The Saiga’s nose has a unique internal structure: the bones are greatly developed and convoluted, and the long nostrils contain numerous hairs, glands and mucous tracts. The trunk-like nose of the Saiga is a striking example of an exaggerated trait, assumed to having evolved as a dust filter for inhaled air. In addition, it functions to elongate the vocal tract in harem saiga males for producing low-formant calls that serve as a cue to body size for conspecifics.

Two subspecies are recognized: Saiga tatarica tatarica, and Saiga tatarica mongolica. The nominate subspecies is found in one location in Russia, while the Mongolian subspecies is found only in western Mongolia.

Renowned for its high reproductive potential, the species was thought to be able to withstand even relatively high levels of hunting for its horns - less than 20 years ago, the total saiga population stood at more than one million, and appeared relatively stable. However, intensified poaching pressures during the 1990s, coupled with a breakdown of law enforcement following the collapse of the Soviet Union, caused numbers to plummet to fewer than 50,000 in just one decade – one of the most sudden and dramatic population crashes of a large mammal ever seen.

Currently the Saiga is classified as Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red List. 

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: [Top: ©Igor Shpilenok | Locality: unknown] - [Bottom: ©Xavier Bayod Farre | Locality: captive at Kölner Zoo, Humboldtkolonie, Cologne, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, 2007]

(via rhamphotheca)

asylum-art:

Yudy Sauw: Fascinating faces of bugs, bulging eyes to ants’ sensitive antennae

Photo Gallery | 500px| Facebook

Insects may be small, but they have some of the most intricate faces in the animal kingdom.

Now a wildlife photographer has captured extreme close-ups of the creepy crawlies, revealing the complex compound eyes of flies, aggressive stance of ants and even water drops clinging onto one insect’s hairy face.

The striking images were shot by 33-year-old Yudy Sauw at his home studio in Tangerang, Indonesia.

His models included a soldier fly, red ant and a longhorn beetle, which he painstakingly watched to get the best shot.

While the creatures may not sound particularly exotic, they are interesting. Soldier flies mimic organ pipe mud dauber wasps and longhorn beetles make pests of themselves by boring into wood to damage trees and houses. 

To take his photographs, Mr Sauw placed the insects between half an inch (2cm) and four inches (10cm) away from his camera.

He used specialist lighting and a macro lens on his camera to record the creatures’ portraits, before enhancing them on a computer.

Mr Sauw said: ‘I love macrography because I can see clearly what I cannot see with my normal eyes.

‘I can see the small world of insects, what they look like and what they do.’

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magictransistor:

Juan Gatti. Ciencias Naturales. Anatomical Collage.

(via atelierentomologica)